Mary Lynn Buchanan: Jesse Mockrin and Elsa Sahal at Nathalie Karg Gallery

“‘X’ frames a conversation between two mid-career artists, each immersed in her own philosophical, thematic and technical trajectories, who nonetheless find numerous points of dialog and exchange. ‘X’ might variously be understood as an intersection, a collaboration, a multiplication, or an excision.” - Jonathan Griffin (source)

 

The title literally refers to a cross between the two artists, an intersection of their works. There is something quite magical about sculpture accompanying paintings as we’ve seen recently in Daniel Arsham’s most recent exhibit. Not only is there an intersection between these two artists, but there’s an intersection and an exchange between the two dimensional and three dimensional.

 

“[Oil paint and clay] are both naturally suited to the depiction of the human form. In this exhibition, oil paint and clay manifest both mainstream and marginal embodiments of feminine beauty, desire, desirability and power.”  - Jonathan Griffin (source

 

 

"Throughout the exhibition, fingers and figures intertwine, gestures are liberated from their original contexts, and bodies are frozen in the midst of dramatic action." - Jonathan Griffin (source

 

Mockrin brings her characteristic style that’s reminiscent of “European painting of the 17th and 18th centuries” but she gives it her signature twist in two ways. Mockrin strategically edits the scene by chopping it into pieces and zooming in on key parts of the figure, almost like a film producer.

 

Mockrin is not only inspired by the style of paintings of the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe; she’s inspired by the works created by Male artists that represent violence towards women throughout history. However she’s not glorifying these works in the same way of the past, she’s making them personal by editing the scenes to make the subject matter more about the struggle, the pain, and the shame these violent acts inflict. 

 

Mockrin is not only inspired by the style of paintings of the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe; she’s inspired by the works created by Male artists that represent violence towards women throughout history. However she’s not glorifying these works in the same way of the past, she’s making them personal by editing the scenes to make the subject matter more about the struggle, the pain, and the shame these violent acts inflict. 

 

“In Sahal’s ceramic sculptures, abstracted forms waver in and out of bodily representation, gender identification and conventional standards of beauty and ugliness, transcendence and debasement.” - Jonathan Griffin (source)

 

Sahal also makes the viewer look closer by zooming in on particular body parts, making it a more personal intimate experience. 

 

Link to artilce here

February 2, 2021